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Classic Art Films shared CriterionForum.org's photo.

Orson Welles's Othello includes restored 4K digital transfers of two versions of the film, the 1952 European version and the 1955 U.S. version! Finally!
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Classic Art Films shared CriterionForum.org's photo — feeling excited.

Beautiful cover art! First day buy for me! It even comes with Ozu's silent comedy masterpiece I Was Born, But ...(1932) with a score composed by Donald Sosin!
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Classic Art Films shared Libero Cinema in Libera Mente's post.

R.I.P. Emmanuelle Riva (1927 – 2017)
Hiroshima mon amour (Alain Resnais, 1959)
Amour (Michael Haneke, 2012)
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Emmanuelle Riva (Cheniménil, 24 febbraio 1927 – Parigi, 27 gennaio 2017) Hiroshima mon amour (Alain Resnais, 1959) Amour (Michael Haneke, 2012)

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Classic Art Films added 3 new photos — watching Through a Glass Darkly.

I decided to spend my weekend watching Ingmar Bergman's Silence of God Trilogy (1961-1963). Through a Glass Darkly, Winter Light and The Silence are a series of intellectual and emotional chamber dramas that explore religion, a persons lack of faith and the alienation of the modern age. All three films were beautifully shot by cinematographer Sven Nykvist while each story reveals director Ingmar Bergman's own personal spiritual crisis at the time. Bergman once stated that he lost his faith at age eight, and only came to terms with this fact while filming Winter Light.

SPOILERS: The first installment Through a Glass Darkly is my personal favorite of the three. It explores a mentally ill woman named Karin suffering from schizophrenia. Her father, husband and brother all decide to take her on a vacation to a remote island retreat. But what Karin soon discovers is that her father is using her own mental illness for his own literary means. And once Karin's hallucinations begin to spiral out of control her family watches in horror as she descents into madness. When her tortured psyche creates a disturbing vision of God, it appears to her shockingly in the form of a spider.
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Classic Art Films added 3 new photos — watching The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp.

"Do you know how many wars I've been in? I was fighting for my country while your father was still in bum- freezers! You laugh at my big belly but you don't know how I got it! You laugh at my mustache but you don't know why I grew it!"

-- Clive Wynne-Candy
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"Everyone wants to be Cary Grant. Even I want to be Cary Grant."

Happy Birthday to one of my favorite actors of Hollywood's Golden Age! My top five favorite Cary Grant films are:

1. Notorious (Alfred Hitchcock, 1946)
2. His Girl Friday (Howard Hawks, 1940)
3. Arsenic and Old Lace (Frank Capra, 1944)
4. North by Northwest (Alfred Hitchcock, 1959)
5. Charade (Stanley Donen, 1963)
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Classic Art Films shared Libero Cinema in Libera Mente's photo.

"Millions of books written on every conceivable subject by all these great minds and in the end, none of them knows anything more about the big questions of life than I do ... I read Socrates. This guy knocked off little Greek boys. What the hell's he got to teach me? And Nietzsche, with his theory of eternal recurrence. He said that the life we lived we're gonna live over again the exact same way for eternity. Great. That means I'll have to sit through the Ice Capades again. It's not worth it. And Freud, another great pessimist. I was in analysis for years and nothing happened. My poor analyst got so frustrated, the guy finally put in a salad bar. Maybe the poets are right. Maybe love is the only answer."
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Hannah and Her Sisters (Woody Allen, 1986)

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Classic Art Films added 3 new photos — watching The Big City (1963 film).

"The remarkable thing that Ray accomplishes is to make us really deeply care about the fortunes of this simple family. That is why I have so much trouble approaching Ray's films as 'foreign.' They are not foreign. They are about Indians, and I am not an Indian, but Ray's characters have more in common with me than I do the comic-strip characters of Hollywood."

-- Roger Ebert (April 3, 1968)
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Classic Art Films added 3 new photos — watching Early Summer.

“Sooner or later, everyone who loves movies comes to Ozu.”

-- Roger Ebert

Because of it being a calm and dreary day today I decided to sit back, relax and enter the cinematic world of Yasujirô Ozu. The film I chose to watch was the middle installment to his 'Noriko trilogy', Early Summer (1951). This favorably recieved post war trilogy starred his favorite actress Setsuko Hara of Late Spring (1949) and Tokyo Story (1953). Marriage, domestic family life, growing old and the changes in relationships between the generations are among the poignant and universal themes throughout Ozu’s work; and Early Summer is no different. Talk to all you film lovers soon. :)
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Classic Art Films shared The Pleasures of Cinema & Music & Art's photo.

Liv Ullmann in Ingmar Bergman's The Passion of Anna (1969).
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En passion - Liv Ullmann 1969

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Classic Art Films shared ANDREY TARKOVSKY INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE - OFFICIAL PAGE's photo. ... See MoreSee Less

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Classic Art Films shared Libero Cinema in Libera Mente's photo.

Federico Fellini's Juliet of the Spirits (1965).
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Giulietta degli spiriti (Federico Fellini, 1965)

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