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Classic Art Films shared CriterionForum.org's album.

Some critics have questioned Kenji Mizoguchi’s feminism, as many have speculated that he harbored feelings of guilt regarding women's subjugation and enslavement by men. The Story of the Late Chrysanthemum (1939) is most evident of that, as it tragically portrays how far a woman will go and the sacrifices she is willing to make simply for the sake of a man's success and happiness. I already own Sansho the Bailiff (my personal favorite), Ugetsu and The Life of Oharu. I am extremely excited to add this one to my collection.
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Classic Art Films added 4 new photos.

"I'm funny on camera sometimes. In life, once in a while. Once in a while."

R.I.P. Mr. Wilder. Thank you for all the laughs you have given me and everyone around the world.
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Classic Art Films watching Leaving Las Vegas.

"We both know that I'm a drunk. And I know you are a hooker. I hope you understand that I am a person who is totally at ease with that. Which is not to say that I'm indifferent or I don't care, I do. It simple means that I trust and accept your judgment."
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Classic Art Films added 4 new photos.

"We'll need more! Cats and hedgehogs and lizards...horses and cows and rattlesnakes...lions, tigers...And people!!"
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Classic Art Films shared When Hollywood was "Golden"'s photo.

"Gregory, are you trying to tell me I'm insane?"
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Charles Boyer & Ingrid Bergman - Gaslight, 1944

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Classic Art Films shared Esculpiendo el tiempo's post.

The many films of director Wong Kar-wai.
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Universo Wong Kar-wai.

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Classic Art Films watching Les Diaboliques.

"The most popular motives for murder is either money or passion. The goal of course is canceling the existence of another human being but after the act comes the guilt and the clumsiness of trying to get away with it. Perfect murders thankfully occur much more often in fiction then in real life, and like perfect art, doesn't exist, but it's never stopped a murderer or artist from trying. Director Henri-Georges Clouzot has always been labeled as the 'French Hitchcock' and Les Diaboliques (1955) has always been quoted as "the greatest Hitchcock film that Hitchcock did not make."

Les Diaboliques is a near-perfect movie about a near-perfect murder, a film in which the director's methods are equally matched as the killers, in cunning and ruthlessness. I believe that the famous bathtub sequence in the murder plot is as shocking or even more so then Psycho's infamous shower scene, and ironically Robert Bloch, the author of the novel Psycho, has stated in an interview that his all-time favorite horror film is Les Diaboliques. Alfred Hitchcock also said to also be a huge admirer of Clouzot's film and even screened it for the writers of Vertigo, because the murder plot and the using and manipulation of an innocent victim were similar themes used in both stories."
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Classic Art Films shared Kinoimages.com's post.

Agnes Varda and Catherine Deneuve at the Venice Film Festival, 1966.
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Classic Art Films shared Libero Cinema in Libera Mente's photo.

Mamma Roma (Pier Paolo Pasolini, 1962)
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Classic Art Films shared The Pleasures of Cinema & Music & Art's post.

• "Eraserhead" (David Lynch, 1977)
• "Repulsion" (Roman Polanski, 1965)
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Classic Art Films watching Kiss Me Deadly.

Robert Aldrich's Kiss me Deadly (1955) is a sleazy and brutal low-budget B thriller of cold-war paranoia which became a shining example for the New Wave directors like Godard and Truffaut. Considered today to be one of the all-time classics of the film noir genre it also featured a preposterous and unforgettable ending of cosmic annihilation which was obviously an influence to Tarantino's Pulp Fiction and Spielberg's Raiders of the Lost Ark.
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"When people are shot in Bonnie and Clyde they are literally blown to bits. Perhaps that seems shocking. But perhaps at this time, it is useful to be reminded that bullets really do tear skin and bone, and that they don't make nice round little holes like the Swiss cheese effect in Fearless Fosdick.

This is pretty clearly the best American film of the year. It is also a landmark. Years from now it is quite possible that Bonnie and Clyde will be seen as the definitive film of the 1960s, showing with sadness, humor and unforgiving detail what one society had come to. The fact that the story is set 35 years ago doesn't mean a thing. It had to be set sometime. But it was made now and it's about us."

-- Roger Ebert (September 25, 1967)
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Classic Art Films watching Nightmare Alley.

Nightmare Alley (1947) is one of my all-time favorite film-noirs and probably one of the grittiest and underrated American movies to come out of the 1940’s. Tyrone Power gives a disturbing and powerful performance as a professional con-man named Stanton. One day he arrives at a carnival and is immediately taken in by an illegal side-show called ‘The Geek’ which involves a lunatic who bites off the heads of live chickens. Attracted by the provocative sensationalism of the business Stanton decides to open up his own personal side-show, presenting to the public small tricks like the illusion of electricity which later transitions into mind-reading and psychic ability.

Right from the beginning Stanton is a despicable character, a greedy, manipulating alcoholic and fraud. He goes to great lengths to become the greatest financial success he can be, all by taking advantage of the weak and vulnerability of the public. With the help of a smart but shady psychiatrist Stanton ultimately begins to convince several wealthy people that he can speak to the spirit world and communicate with their dead loved ones. Like all manipulating charlatan's who unfortunately become greatly successful, Stanton’s ego and power begins to consume him. He even begins to believe his very own con and that he DOES in fact have the supernatural ability to harness the power to conjure up spirits.

In one of the most frightening and disturbing sequences of the film Stanton enlists a woman to impersonate the diseased wife of an elderly millionaire. He knows that if he can convince this skeptic that he is in fact what he says he is this man will financially support Stanton and he will be forever set. Nightmare Alley is a painfully honest and provocative film and its themes are still very relevant today. It immediately brings to mind psychics and prophets like Peter Popoff, Sylvia Browne, Uri Geller, John Edwards and Theresa Caputo. This is a truly haunting classic that shows us that as long as there are people who will impulsively buy into such irrational and illogical thinking there is always someone who will come along and take advantage of such thinking.
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"Mr. Falco, let it be said at once, is a man of 40 faces, not one - none too pretty, and all deceptive. You see that grin? That's the, eh, that's the Charming Street Urchin face. It's part of his helpless act: he throws himself upon your mercy. He's got a half-dozen faces for the ladies." ... See MoreSee Less

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Classic Art Films shared Celluloid Heroes's photo.

"Most audiences settle for a nice movie. We think 'I don't want to see something different! I don't want to see something different! I don't want to see something different! I hate it! I want this...I want action!' And when you see something that's different you can't get it out of your mind. You're still angry with the son of a gun. 'I hated that picture! I hated it...hated it!' But ten years later you remember it. And you think 'I saw something that's interesting.'"

-- John Cassavetes
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Director John Cassavetes on the set of "A Woman Under the Influence", 1974.

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